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  • Writer's pictureDamian Brzeski

National Anthem Museum in Będomin

Do you know where the Polish national anthem was born? In the picturesque village of Będomin, in Kashubia, there is an extraordinary place - the National Anthem Museum. It was here, in the former manor house, that Józef Wybicki, the author of the lyrics of "Mazurek Dąbrowski", was born.


The museum, founded in 1978, is located in a carefully restored manor house and offers a unique journey through the history of the Polish anthem and its creator.


Visit the National Anthem Museum in Będomin and immerse yourself in the fascinating story of one of the most important symbols of Polishness, learning about both the life of Józef Wybicki and the rich history of our national anthem!



National Anthem Museum in Będomin

History of the National Anthem Museum in Będomin


The National Anthem Museum in Będomin is a unique place that attracts history and culture lovers.


It is located in the picturesque village of Będomin in Kashubia, in a former manor house where Józef Wybicki, the creator of the Polish national anthem - Mazurka Dąbrowskiego, was born.


Founded in 1978, the museum was created on the initiative of the local community and history lovers to honor the memory of the great Pole and promote knowledge of the Polish anthem.


The manor house where the museum is located has been carefully restored to reflect the atmosphere of the times in which Józef Wybicki lived and worked.


Who was Józef Wybicki?


Józef Wybicki is an extremely important figure in the history of Poland. He was born on September 29, 1747 in Będomin in Pomerania, into a noble family of the Rogala coat of arms.


He was a lawyer, politician, writer and publicist, but he was most famous as the author of the words of Mazurek Dąbrowski, which became the Polish national anthem.


From a young age, Wybicki stood out for his literary abilities and interest in public affairs. He began his education at the Jesuit college in Stare Scots, and later studied law at the University of Leiden.


His political career began early when, as a young man, he took part in the Bar Confederation, which was an armed uprising of the nobility against Russian domination and King Stanisław August Poniatowski.


Political and Military Activities


During the Bar Confederation, Wybicki showed not only courage, but also organizational and diplomatic talent.


After the fall of the Confederation, he emigrated to the Netherlands, where he continued his studies and established numerous political contacts.


After returning to Poland, he became involved in the Four-Year Sejm and supported the reforms of the Constitution of May 3.


Cooperation with Jan Henryk Dąbrowski


The most significant period in Wybicki's life began in 1795, when, after the third partition of Poland, he decided to support independence aspirations abroad.


In Paris he met General Jan Henryk Dąbrowski, with whom he established close cooperation. Together they organized Polish Legions in Italy, which were to fight alongside Napoleon's army.


Dąbrowski's Mazurek


In 1797, while staying in the Italian town of Reggio nell'Emilia, Wybicki wrote the lyrics to the Dąbrowski Mazurka, also known as "The Song of the Polish Legions in Italy".


The song quickly gained popularity among Polish soldiers and became a symbol of hope for regaining independence. Her words express longing for a free Poland and faith in regaining the lost homeland.


Poetic Activities and Writing


In addition to his political and military activities, Wybicki was also a talented writer and poet. His literary work includes numerous poems, dramas and journalism in which he touched on patriotic and social topics.


His most important literary works include the drama "Piast" and numerous political articles and columns.


Józef Wybicki married Kunegunda Drwęska , with whom he had five children. After returning to Poland after the fall of Napoleon, he settled in Pomerania, where he took up property management and social activities.


In 1817, he was appointed senator of the Kingdom of Poland , but his political activity was limited by the difficult political situation in the country.


Józef Wybicki died on March 10, 1822 in Manieczki near Śrem. His figure and work have left a lasting mark on the history of Poland, and Dąbrowski's Mazurka is still a symbol of Polish patriotism and the fight for freedom.


Dąbrowski's Mazurek

Dąbrowski's Mazurka: A hymn that unites Poles


Dąbrowski's Mazurka, also known as "The Song of the Polish Legions in Italy", is a piece that has inspired and united Poles for over two centuries.


Its text was written by Józef Wybicki in 1797, and the melody refers to traditional Polish mazurkas. The anthem has become a symbol of hope for regaining independence and the spiritual unity of the Polish nation.


The meaning of individual stanzas in the hymn:


  1. Verse one : "Poland has not yet perished while we are alive. What foreign violence has taken from us, we will take back with the saber.”

  • It expresses the nation's steadfastness and faith in regaining independence, regardless of difficulties.

  1. Second verse: "March, march, Dąbrowski, From Italian land to Poland. With your guidance, I will unite with the nation.”

  • He calls on General Dąbrowski to return with the Polish Legions from Italy to Poland to fight for freedom and unite the nation.

  1. Verse three: "I will cross the Vistula, I will cross the Warta, I will be Poles. Bonaparte gave us an example of how we must win.

  • It contains references to the great rivers of Poland, symbolizing the determination to fight on one's own land, and to Napoleon Bonaparte as a model of effective fighting.

  1. Verse four: "Like Czarniecki to Poznań After the Swedish partition, I will return across the sea to save my homeland."

  • It refers to the heroism of Hetman Stefan Czarniecki, who returned to Poland after victories over the Swedes to save his homeland.

  1. Verse five: "The father is already there, crying to his Basia, saying: - Just listen, they say our people are beating with drums."

  2. He describes emotional scenes where a father tells his daughter of his hope for victory while hearing the sound of drums in battle.


Full text of the Dąbrowski Mazurka:


Poland has not yet perished while we are alive. What foreign violence has taken from us, we will take back with the saber. March, march, Dąbrowski, From Italian land to Poland. Following your lead, I will unite with the nation.


I will cross the Vistula, I will cross the Warta, I will be Poles. Bonaparte gave us an example, How to win. March, march, Dąbrowski, From Italy to Poland. Following your lead, I will unite with the nation.


Like Czarniecki to Poznań After the Swedish partition, To save the homeland I will return across the sea. March, march, Dąbrowski, From Italian land to Poland. Following your lead, I will unite with the nation.


Already there, the father says to his Basia in tears: Listen, they say our people are beating the tarabany. March, march, Dąbrowski, From Italy to Poland. Following your lead, I will unite with the nation.


Reconstruction of Józef Wybicki's room

Visiting the Museum: What to See?


While visiting the National Anthem Museum in Będomin, visitors have the opportunity to see numerous exhibits related to the life and work of Józef Wybicki and the history of the Polish anthem.


The following deserve special attention:


  • Reconstruction of Józef Wybicki's room : There are many personal items belonging to Wybicki and furniture from his era.

  • Documents and manuscripts: In the museum you can see the original manuscripts of the Dąbrowski Mazurka and other important historical documents.

  • Portraits and paintings: The exhibits include portraits of Wybicki and paintings depicting scenes from Polish history.


The museum has extensive collections, which include not only memorabilia of Józef Wybicki, but also exhibits related to the history of the anthem and the fight for Poland's independence.


These include:


  • Musical instruments: Used to play the Dąbrowski Mazurka over the centuries.

  • Military and civilian costumes: From various periods, related to the Polish Legions and the figure of Józef Wybicki.

  • Books and prints : Concerning the history of Poland, national anthems and the biography of Józef Wybicki.


The National Anthem Museum in Będomin hides many interesting facts and curiosities.


Here are a few of them:


  • Unique location: This is the only museum in Poland devoted exclusively to the national anthem.

  • Interactive Exhibitions: The museum features modern, interactive exhibits that allow visitors to better understand the history of the anthem.

  • Educational programs: The museum organizes numerous workshops and museum lessons for children and teenagers, promoting knowledge about the Polish anthem and history.


Practical Information for Visitors


If you are planning to visit the National Anthem Museum in Będomin, here is some practical information that may be useful to you:


  • Opening hours: The museum is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10:00 to 17:00. It is closed on Mondays.

  • Ticket prices: Entrance tickets cost PLN 10 for adults and PLN 5 for children and teenagers. Family and group tickets are also available.

  • Location and access: Będomin is located approximately 60 km from Gdańsk. You can reach it by car, tourist taxi or public transport (buses and trains to nearby towns).


Museum in Będomin

Why is it worth visiting the National Anthem Museum in Będomin?


A visit to the National Anthem Museum in Będomin is a unique opportunity to explore the history of the Polish anthem and learn more about its creator, Józef Wybicki. It is a place full of history that allows you to understand how important Dąbrowski's Mazurek is to Poles.


By visiting the museum, you can not only see many valuable exhibits, but also feel the spirit of those times and better understand how important a role the anthem played in difficult moments in Polish history.


The museum also offers numerous attractions for children and adults, making it a perfect place for a family educational trip.


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