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  • Writer's pictureDamian Brzeski

Why are German taxis the color of pudding?

Why are German taxis the color of pudding? This question may seem funny, but it has an interesting history and practical reasons behind it. The color of German taxis, known as "Elfenbein" (ivory), was chosen not only for aesthetic reasons.


It plays a key role in road safety, brand identification and traditions that date back to the 1970s. Find out why this seemingly unusual decision makes sense and how it affects driving comfort for both drivers and passengers. Read on to learn the fascinating history of German taxis and their specific color!



German taxi somewhere on the street of Berlin

Why are German taxis the color of pudding, mayonnaise and ivory?


The color of German taxis, also known as "Elfenbein", "ivory" or "mayonnaise", has its roots in a decision made in 1971.


Before this date, taxis in West Germany were usually painted black. However, the then Minister of Transport, Georg Leber, initiated a change in this trend by establishing that the new, corporate and mandatory color for taxis would be the paint marked with the RAL 1015 code.


Why was the color of the pudding chosen?


  1. Stand out on the road: The bright color is easily visible in traffic, increasing safety for both passengers and pedestrians.

  2. Brand Identification: Standardized color helps customers quickly identify taxis. In crowded cities such as Berlin or Munich, this is especially important.

  3. Tradition: The choice of color had a practical justification. The light shade of "pudding" made dirt and minor scratches less visible, making the taxis look neater.

  4. Thermal comfort: In those days, air conditioning in vehicles was not common, and black cars became very hot in the sun. The lighter color helped reduce the temperature inside the taxi, making the ride more comfortable for drivers and passengers.


The history of taxi in Germany and the current taxi market


The history of German taxis dates back to the early 20th century, when the first organized transport services appeared in larger cities such as Berlin and Hamburg. Before World War II, taxis were mostly black, which gave them an elegant appearance.


The real change came in 1971, when Transport Minister Georg Leber introduced regulations to standardize the color of taxis. It was decided that the new corporate color would be "ivory white" (RAL 1015).


Taxi market today


Currently, the taxi market in Germany is well organized and highly regulated. Each city has its own licensed taxi companies that must meet certain standards and regulations. For example, taxis must be equipped with meters, and drivers must undergo regular health tests and have special licenses.


In large cities such as Berlin, Munich and Hamburg, there are also mobile applications for ordering taxis, such as FreeNow, Taxi.de, or MyTaxi, which compete with Uber, which had to adapt to German legal regulations and operate only with certified drivers. drivers and vehicles.


What is the difference between German taxis and Polish ones?


  1. Legal regulations: The German taxi market is more restrictive. There are strict regulations regarding licensing, vehicle operation and toll rates. In Poland, regulations are less stringent, which allows for greater flexibility, but also for greater differences in service standards.

  2. Technology: German taxis are often equipped with modern technology such as payment terminals, GPS and fleet monitoring systems. In Poland, although technology is also playing an increasingly important role, you can still find taxis without such facilities.


Prices: Taxi costs in Germany are usually higher than in Poland, due to the higher cost of living and more restrictive regulations. German taxi drivers often have to pay high license fees and be subject to strict technical inspections of their vehicles.


The history of taxi in Germany and the current taxi market


The history of German taxis dates back to the early 20th century, when the first organized transport services appeared in larger cities such as Berlin and Hamburg.

 

The history of taxis in Germany


Taxi transport in Germany has its origins in the 17th century, when seats began to be used to transport people in cities such as Berlin. In the 19th century, horse-drawn carriages, known as "Droschken", became popular and were used throughout Europe.


The breakthrough came in 1897, when the first cab taximeter was introduced in Stuttgart. The taximeter, a device for measuring distances and calculating fares, has become a standard and has significantly influenced the development of the taxi industry, enabling more transparent and accurate settlements.


After World War II, Berlin, like many other aspects of city life, was divided. East Berlin had its own taxis, often of the Wolga brand, while West Berlin was dominated by Mercedes-Benz models, which became iconic for the region.


The taxi system in the two parts of the city differed significantly, reflecting broader political and economic divisions.


In 1971, to standardize the appearance of taxis and improve their visibility, Transport Minister Georg Leber introduced the color ivory (RAL 1015) as mandatory for all taxis in Germany.


This choice had several practical justifications: the light color was more visible on the road, helped keep vehicles clean, and also limited the heating of the car interior on hot days.


The German taxi market at present


Currently, the taxi market in Germany is well organized and highly regulated. Each city has its own licensed taxi companies that must meet certain standards and regulations. Taxis must be equipped with meters, and drivers must undergo regular health tests and have special licenses.


In larger cities such as Berlin, Munich or Hamburg, there are also mobile applications for ordering taxis, such as FreeNow, Taxi.de, or MyTaxi. Uber, which had to adapt to German legal regulations, operates only with certified drivers and vehicles.


Taxi fares in Germany are usually higher than in Poland, which is due to the higher cost of living and more restrictive regulations.


German taxi drivers often have to pay high licensing fees and be subject to strict technical inspections of their vehicles. German taxis are often equipped with modern technologies such as payment terminals, GPS and fleet monitoring systems.


Ivory German Taxi

Taxis colors around the world


Taxis colors vary and often reflect local regulations, traditions and practical needs.


Here's an overview of taxi colors in some key cities and countries:


1. United States - New York: Yellow taxis are one of the most recognizable symbols of New York. The color yellow was introduced in 1967 to distinguish licensed taxis on crowded streets. There are currently approximately 13,500 yellow taxis in New York, mainly in Manhattan. There are also light green "boro taxis" serving other districts.


2. Great Britain - London: In London, traditional black taxis, known as "black cabs", are a symbol of elegance and class. The black color is practical, hiding dirt and scratches, which helps keep vehicles clean. The licensing system for these taxis has existed since the 17th century.


3. Japan - Tokyo: Taxis in Tokyo are usually white, reflecting the Japanese aesthetic of minimalism and cleanliness. The white color also helps maintain a lower temperature inside the vehicle on hot days and is a symbol of professionalism and reliability of transport services.


4. India - Kolkata: In Kolkata, most taxis are painted yellow. As in New York, the color yellow is highly visible and helps passengers easily spot available taxis on busy city streets.


5. Mexico - Mexico: Taxis in Mexico have a distinctive green and white color, but since 2014 pink taxis driven by women for women have also become popular. The pink taxis are equipped with an emergency button and GPS to increase passenger safety.


6. Morocco: In Morocco, the color of taxis varies from city to city. In Casablanca, Rabat and Fes, green taxis dominate, while in Marrakech and Agadir they are red. Yellow taxis can be found in some tourist areas.


7. Australia - Sydney: In Sydney, most taxis are white. The white color is practical in Australia's hot climate as it helps keep the temperature inside the vehicle lower.


8. Spain: In Spain, taxi colors vary from city to city. In Madrid, taxis are white with a red stripe, while in Barcelona they are black with yellow doors. These colors help residents and tourists easily identify licensed taxis.


Taxis colors vary around the world and are intended to be easily identified and increase visibility and safety on the roads.

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